Tag Archives: travel

Passing Scott Jurek, Day 20, 27.0 miles

The rain didn’t relent through the entire night. It seeped in through the side and heavy drops splashed on me from the sides of the tarp. By midnight I was soaked but the Downtek coated down in my Enlightened Equipment quilt kept the down dry and lofted, keeping me warm and asleep.

Beautiful welcome into Mass
Beautiful welcome into Mass

Continue reading Passing Scott Jurek, Day 20, 27.0 miles

Massachusetts Appalachian Trail, Day 19, 42.3 miles

Hiking down Stratton Mountain I felt elated and completely at peace. A couple miles from the summit I saw a couple hikers setting up hammocks just off the trail. Enjoying the relaxing pace I had adopted this evening I sat down for a minute to check my mileages on my phone and ask them about the trail conditions down the hill. As was becoming the norm they couldn’t believe I was camping with such a tiny pack. Both engineers from Boston, they asked where I was from. I told them Richmond and one of them said he was dating a girl in Richmond. I found out she went to a rival high school and graduated a year before me. Simple things like that bring back little pieces of home and made the trip much more bearable. It was a cool little reminder of the connectedness in this world. In my loneliest moments, I always found there was a little bit of home everywhere, whether in some familiar looking woods, or in a phone call home, in a stranger’s friendliness, or in a crazy connection. Continue reading Massachusetts Appalachian Trail, Day 19, 42.3 miles

Stratton Mountain: Day 18, 36.7 miles

When light crept through the trees and lit the fog around the shelter I dreaded the idea of another day. My stomach was empty and growling after a night of vomiting. Others gathered their stuff, packed up, and set off to go hiking. I laid on the shelter floor, dust from dirty boots coating my quilt and sleeping pad. The misty rain had washed the strewn remains of last nights meal spilled outside the shelter, but I had not forgotten. After a couple disappointing days just two days ago, I desperately wanted to be okay. But it was too early after such a long night so I rolled over and went back to sleep.

Eventually my stomach settled and the thought of continuing became less unbearable than the thought of stopping. That’s really all it ever was, never inspiration to continue, just dread at the thought of quitting my Appalachian Trail unsupported record attempt so early. Continue reading Stratton Mountain: Day 18, 36.7 miles

Little Rock Pond Shelter: Day 17, 34.0 miles

I got a great night’s sleep and slept in a bit to enjoy the continental breakfast. I had psyched myself up in the night and this morning was getting excited to get back out there and log some miles. I ate pounds of fresh fruit for breakfast, avoiding the heavier stuff because I was still full of pastries, chips, and ice cream from last night. I checked out and began working my way back to the trail.

Soon I was climbing my first ascent of the day and recognized a spot where I took my first ‘zero in the woods’ 6 years ago. I had set up my tent and stayed in it for the night, the following day, and another night, only rising to find water and relieve myself. It was a glorious mindless, relaxing day and by the time the next morning rolled around I was reinvigorated to continue hiking. But I didn’t have the option to do that on this trip, my recovery periods were little over the 8 hours I had to sleep each night, and sometimes less than that. The only way I can think of attempting the Appalachian Trail unsupported record is like racing a marathon, getting super excited to have finished, and then a couple hours later having to do it all over again. And again. And again. And when it rains, when the winds are unrelenting, when the cold pierces your clothing, and when you don’t get a wink of sleep, again. Continue reading Little Rock Pond Shelter: Day 17, 34.0 miles

Greenbrier Inn, Killington: Day 16, 22.7 miles

I slept in till 7am, used my Buff to cover my eyes well after the sun had risen. I went to bed before it set and rose after it was above the horizon. For the first time on the trip I dreamed. I actually dreamed. I put myself in a place other than on this brutal trail that was challenging me at every turn and I was happy. But when I woke up, with the sun rising and the air warm, I was actually elated to still be out here. Time to get back and rein in the deficit that I accumulated yesterday. I started packing up my stuff and realized I probably didn’t have enough food to get me to my next resupply. It was over 20 miles away and I was supposed to be there, or at least close, last night. I was kicking myself but there was a farm stand just a few miles down the trail. Continue reading Greenbrier Inn, Killington: Day 16, 22.7 miles

“That is the reward the mountains give to effort”- Sir Francis Younghusband

“To those who have struggled with them, the mountains reveal beauties that they will not disclose to those who make no effort. That is the reward the mountains give to effort. And it is because they have so much to give and give it so lavishly to those who will wrestle with them that men love the mountains and go back to them again and again. The mountains reserve their choice gifts for those who stand upon their summits.”

-Sir Francis Younghusband

June 23, Day 15, 21.5 miles, Vermont Appalachian Trail

I got an early start this morning to work my way into Hanover. The rain started around 4 and made it a tough morning to leave the comfort of the shelter despite a leaky roof. But I wanted food and wanted to get a solid mileage in today to back up that I can do the 40 mile days back to back.

In town the gloominess persisted. I went to a diner, Lou’s Restaurant and Bakery, where I had eaten 6 years ago when I came through. I pulled off my poncho to keep from looking too homeless inside and rolled it up and put it in my pack. I was dripping wet, shorts absolutely soaking and shoes squeaking with each step. While I wandered around looking for an outlet to charge my phone another customer asked if she could lend me her towel to dry off. It was very thoughtful of her and I told her thanks but I would just be getting drenched in another hour so I declined the offer. Continue reading June 23, Day 15, 21.5 miles, Vermont Appalachian Trail

Velvet Rocks Shelter, Day 14, 41.8 miles

Sorry for the vertical video but this is my log for the day:

I didn’t end up keeping a video log because I ran out of room on my phone storage which was a real bummer.

A couple more notes on the day: Continue reading Velvet Rocks Shelter, Day 14, 41.8 miles

Mitzpah Hut, Day 11, 14.8 miles

Last night when I arrived at Osgood Tentsite I was relieved to see several other groups camping as well. On the way in signs had warned me of issues with bears in the area and 6 years ago when I stayed here bears had raided several food bags as I slept. The park had installed bear boxes which would eliminate the concern for losing my food but the threat of waking up to a bear sniffing the chocolate buried in my mustache was still very real. But when I walked up it turns out bears weren’t the wildlife to be concerned with but rather a large moose foraging in the surrounding brush.

Continue reading Mitzpah Hut, Day 11, 14.8 miles

Osgood Tentsite, Day 10, 26 miles

Marni and Eric had prepared me a huge breakfast that I could heat up and eat before everyone else was up so I didn’t have to wait. It was a huge help. Also at the hostel was a guy, Will, who was the first SOBO thru-hiker to hit this point. He had taken a zero yesterday and we caught up over pizza last night. He had gotten in touch with me before we started and exchanged notes on gear and diet. I had told him about my shoes getting ripped up from the mud and rocks in Maine and showed him the four inch gash in the side. He told me he had mailed himself a pair of shoes but was going to continue hiking in the shoes he was wearing. They were exactly my size and he was just going to leave them in the hiker box. It couldn’t have been better luck and I am seriously thankful to him for letting me wear them out of Gorham. I had been worried about my shoes which looked more like sandals at this point. My next pair wasn’t till northern Vermont and I highly doubted this pair would last that long. I had clean, new Darn Tough socks waiting for me in this mail drop and getting Will’s shoes were an amazing addition. Continue reading Osgood Tentsite, Day 10, 26 miles